PROSECCO, BEST ITALIAN SPARKLING WINE


Prosecco is quality sparkling wine made primarily in Veneto region of northeastern Italy near the city of Treviso which is about a half one hour drive north of Venice. Historically close proximity to the great culture and wealth of the region, Prosecco’s wine quality and popularity (dry, light, fruity and floral sparkling wine, plus very affordable) have been growing worldwide today.

Prosecco is made with primarily Prosecco grapes (aka “Glera”, a local green varietal), created around mid-19th century when a sparkling wine making method called the “Tank Method”, use of large high-tech fermentation steal tank was invented. It makes simpler and faster spumante (sparkling) wine than labor and time consuming traditional, classic Champagne production method which requires twice the fermentation process in the bottles by human hands.

Tank Method is that still wine’s second fermentation (adding sugar and east to obtain CO2) is done in the temperature controlled big cooling tank and then fill and coke bottles. This simpler and quicker mechanical production process makes Prosecco much affordable than classic method of French Champagne.





What are the real differences between Prosecco and French Champagne?  Prosecco is made with at least 85% Glera/prosecco grapes and it is also allowed to blend up to 15% of other grapes that grow in the region. Glera grapes make crisp and green apple like, light fruity flavor wine….the other hand  Champagne is made with red grapes, Pinot Noir, Pinot Munier, and Chardonnay grapes which make wine very complex taste and flavor (and longer lasting sparkles). Majority Prosecco production is DOC (Denominazione di Origine Controllata); however some of the best qualities Prosecco are labeled “Superiore di Cartizze” come from a sub-zone within Valdobbiadene called Prosecco di Conegliano-Valdobbiadene (DOCG). Prosecco is dry, light, crisp and fruitier than Champagne and less expensive, generally half price of non-vintage Champagne. Prosecco is appeal to both aperitif and fizzy cocktail such like Aperol and Mimosa.  


As far as sweetness goes; Prosecco DOC comes in four levels; from driest to sweetest: Brut, Extra Dry, Dry and Demi-Sec. Superiore DOCG, however, only come in the first three.


Flavors/aromas:
Green apple, honeydew melon, pear, lemon, floury honeysuckle and a bit fresh cream

Character/structure:
Light to medium bodied. Mild acidity and low alcohol (typically about 11%). Prosecco has lighter, frothy bubbles that don’t last as long like Champagne. Still, the aromas in Prosecco smell fabulous. Well produced Prosecco offers aromas of tropical fruits; banana cream, hazelnut, vanilla, and honeycomb.

Food Pairing with Prosecco:
Prosecco is versatile and pairs well with a wide range of cuisine genres and dishes. It’s one of those wines that can be served as an aperitif (before food drink) but also works well alongside the main entrée.
Italian style appetizers such like antipasto, crostini, beef carpaccio, cured meats (prosciutto, culatello), prosciutto-wrapped melon or fig, risotto, medium-intensity foods (chicken, pork, shellfish, white flesh fish dishes etc.). Prosecco, because its toward sweet and aromatic sparkling, matches well with mild spicy and slightly salty southeast Asian cuisines such as Thai, Singaporean, Vietnamese, Cantonese, and Japanese. Imagine prosecco with sushi or Pad Thai, Vietnamese spring roll for a nice paring.

Cheeses from northern Italy: Asiago, Montasio, Fontina, Piave, Grana Padano, Taleggio



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